Framing composition

  1. Do I have a strong composition? I think I have a strong composition with the framing in the first picture
  2. How well did I edit my photographs? I really tried to blur out the background in the back
  3. What would I do differently if I shot this assignment again? Be mindful of time
  4. Do you think your photographs belong on the blog home page and   should be considered one of the best from all the photo classes? I don’t think its one of the best ones but it’s pretty good.

portrait read and write

  • A good portrait is an image of a person that manages to tell a story.
  • A good portrait evokes emotion.
  •  A good portrait tells us something about the person in the image, and composition is a key element that helps us create a storytelling portrait.
  • I think good composition is a combination of the scene on the ground and the scene within your head.
  •  don’t forget that every image has two people behind it. the photographer and the viewer.
  • photography is both an art and a science.
  •  I made the background much more dominant compared to the previous image.
  •  So, I started with the background and decided on a high angle in order to capture this “mountain” of Paprika.
  •  I waited about 20 minutes to capture the boy looking up.
  •  It was important for me to “include” the path and the big cloud in the horizon, to add sense of an “epic” feel to the image.
  • So I focused only on the face of this young monk, and included almost no background, in order to avoid interference from the environment.
  •  the central composition (the subject is in the center of the frame) is balanced with the two orange frames on the sides.
  • I used soft natural light (coming from the right side of the frame) in order to create a sense of something religious and pure.
  •  is allowed to cut off part of the head like this. Sure, as long as it helps the visual story you want to tell.
  •  By framing his face on the right, while he was looking down and to the right, I wanted to create a feeling of an “unbalanced world”.

portraits

Mode: Manual, Exposure: 1/125 sec; f/5.0; ISO 3200; Pattern metering
Mode: Manual, Exposure: 1/125 sec; f/5.0; ISO 3200; Pattern metering
Mode: Manual, Exposure: 1/125 sec; f/5.0; ISO 3200; Pattern metering
This picture shows good composition, I like how its blurry in the back and everything is focused on her. Her hair color makes the colors pop.

Angles

Mode: Manual Exposure 1/400 sec; f/16; ISO 200; Manual; Pattern metering
Mode: Manual Exposure 1/400 sec; f/16; ISO 200; Manual; Pattern metering
Mode: Manual Exposure 1/400 sec; f/16; ISO 200; Manual; Pattern metering
Mode: Manual Exposure 1/400 sec; f/16; ISO 200; Manual; Pattern metering
I think this shows great composition and low angles. They obviously got right under the Eiffel tower to make this shot.

Exposure

In photography, the exposure settings of aperture, shutter speed and ISO speed are analogous to the width, time and quantity discussed above.   Aperture: controls the area over which light can enter your camera Shutter speed: controls the duration of the exposure ISO speed: controls the sensitivity of your camera’s sensor to a given amount of light aperture affects depth of field, shutter speed affects motion blur and ISO speed affects image noise. A camera’s shutter determines when the camera sensor will be open or closed to incoming light from the camera lens. The shutter speed specifically refers to how long this light is permitted to enter the camera.   Therefore all one usually cares about with shutter speed is whether it results in a sharp photo — either by freezing movement or because the shot can be taken hand-held without camera shake. With digital cameras, the best way to find out is to just experiment and look at the results on your camera’s rear LCD screen (at full zoom). A camera’s aperture setting controls the area over which light can pass through your camera lens. The above f-stop numbers are all standard options in any camera, although most also allow finer adjustments of 1/2 or 1/3 stops, such as f/3.2 and f/6.3. The range of values may also vary from camera to camera (or lens to lens). A camera’s aperture setting is what determines a photo’s depth of field (the range of distance over which objects appear in sharp focus). Lower f-stop values correlate with a shallower depth of field. he ISO speed determines how sensitive the camera is to incoming light. Similar to shutter speed, it also correlates 1:1 with how much the exposure increases or decreases. As a result, ISO speed is usually only increased from its minimum value if the desired aperture and shutter speed aren’t otherwise obtainable. Common ISO speeds include 100, 200, 400 and 800, although many cameras also permit lower or higher values. The camera may also have several pre-set modes; the most common include landscape, portrait, sports and night mode. The symbols used for each mode vary slightly from camera to camera, but will likely appear similar to those below. However, keep in mind that most of the above settings rely on the camera’s metering system in order to know what’s a proper exposure. some of the above modes may also control camera settings which are unrelated to exposure, although this varies from camera to camera. Such additional settings might include the autofocus points, metering mode and autofocus modes, amongst others. With many lenses, their light-gathering ability is also affected by their transmission efficiency, although this is almost always much less of a factor than aperture. It’s also beyond the photographer’s control. Depth of field refers to the range of distance that appears acceptably sharp. It varies depending on camera type, aperture and focusing distance, although print size and viewing distance can also influence our perception of depth of field.
 

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Shadows

Mode: Manual, Exposure: 1/160 sec; f/22; ISO; 200 Manual; Pattern metering
Mode: Manual Exposure: 1/160sec; f/22; ISO 200; ,Manual; Pattern metering
I like this picture because the shadows cool. The shadow looks a like a picture of a unicorn. There’s also a lot of detail on the mans sweater and just everything in the picture in general.

Texture

Mode: Manual Aperture priority; pattern metering Shutter speed ISO: 100 Lens: EF-S18-55mm f?3.5-5.6 IS II

 

Mode: Manual Aperture priority; pattern metering Shutter speed ISO: 100 Lens: EF-S18-55mm f?3.5-5.6 IS II
Mode: Manual Aperture priority; pattern metering Shutter speed ISO: 125 Lens mm: EF-SF-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS II;
I like how detailed the water drops look and the colors pop out very nice. The focus is really good.